Volume 4, Issue 1, March 2019, Page: 1-5
Linearity Test for Harshaw TLD (Type: TLD-100H) Base on Individual Calibration Method
Luay Abdulsahib Rasool, Nuclear Safety Department, Ministry of Science and Technology, Baghdad, Iraq
Naashat Raheem Al-Ataby, Radioecology Department, Ministry of Science and Technology, Baghdad, Iraq
Alaa Fadil Hashim, Radioecology Department, Ministry of Science and Technology, Baghdad, Iraq
Received: Apr. 7, 2019;       Accepted: May 23, 2019;       Published: Jun. 11, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.ns.20190401.11      View  213      Downloads  43
Abstract
The testing of the individual monitoring instruments is important to demonstrate the performance of the instruments to give accurate measurements in workplace environment. In this research, 18 Thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) units were calibrated individually at surface water phantom and exposed with 60Co source at block 32 in Malaysia Nuclear Agency. The TLD were exposed at 5.00 meter distance from the source. The exposed TLD in terms of Personal Dose Equivalent at 10mm depth tissue, (Hp (10)) equal to 2.00mSv. The exposed TLD then be measured using winRems software from Harshaw TLD reader 6600 plus for defining the calibration factor in term of mSv/nC. After that all the 18 unit TLD were tested using linearity testing method and 18 TLD units were exposed with different dose that were 1mSv, 5mSv, 7mSv, 10mSv, 15mSv, and 20mSv. The research is conducted to satisfy two main objectives which was to obtain linear regression coefficient R2 ~ 1 and to show that the ratio of measured value over standard values are within ICRP trumpet acceptance limit curve, which are within (-33% to +50%).
Keywords
Calibration of TLD, Calibration, TLD Dosimetry
To cite this article
Luay Abdulsahib Rasool, Naashat Raheem Al-Ataby, Alaa Fadil Hashim, Linearity Test for Harshaw TLD (Type: TLD-100H) Base on Individual Calibration Method, Nuclear Science. Vol. 4, No. 1, 2019, pp. 1-5. doi: 10.11648/j.ns.20190401.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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