Volume 4, Issue 4, December 2019, Page: 52-59
Review of Distribution of Natural Radiation in Some Parts of Nigeria
Olalekan Ifayefunmi, Department of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Obninsk Institute for Nuclear Power Engineering of the National Research Nuclear University “Mephi”, Obninsk, Russia
Vyaceslav Kupriyanov, Department of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Obninsk Institute for Nuclear Power Engineering of the National Research Nuclear University “Mephi”, Obninsk, Russia
Oleg Mirzeabasov, Department of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Obninsk Institute for Nuclear Power Engineering of the National Research Nuclear University “Mephi”, Obninsk, Russia
Boris Synzynys, Department of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Obninsk Institute for Nuclear Power Engineering of the National Research Nuclear University “Mephi”, Obninsk, Russia
Received: Nov. 21, 2019;       Accepted: Dec. 4, 2019;       Published: Dec. 10, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.ns.20190404.13      View  61      Downloads  22
Abstract
Activity concentrations of natural radioactivity of 40K, 238U, 226Ra, and 232Th were reviewed in connection with rock, soil, sediments, and water in the Northern and Southern parts of Nigeria to estimate the radiation dose acquire by the population. The activity concentrations of the various radionuclides from rock samples collected from different locations were generally higher than those of other environmental matrices. Comparative distribution maps of 40K, 238U, and 232Th show the distribution of activity concentration in the Northern and Western part of Nigeria. The activity concentrations 40K, 238U, and 232Th in rock ranges from 40 Bq kg-1 to 1203 Bq kg-1, 34 Bq kg-1 to 7220 Bq kg-1, and 8 Bq kg-1 to 1680 Bq kg-1 respectively. In soil it ranges from 98.7 Bq kg-1 to 1023.3 Bq kg-1, 15.6 Bq kg-1 to 55.3 Bq kg-1, and 5.2 Bq kg-1 to 195.5 Bq kg-1 respectively. In sediment it ranges 97 Bq kg-1 to 1023 Bq kg-1, 12 Bq kg-1 to 47.9 Bq kg-1, and 11.7 Bq kg-1 to 55.3 Bq kg-1. The concentration of 40K and 238U in granite rocks are higher than the recommended permissible value. All the water samples were found to contain acceptable levels of radionuclides with mean activity values of 3.98±0.26, 11.00±2.58, and 17.73±5.04 Bql-1 for 40K, 232Th, and 238U, respectively showing that the mean activity of 238U for all the samples is the highest when compared with those of 40K and 232Th. The mean absorbed dose rate for all the area is 0.123mSvyr-1, which is very low when compared to the recommended limit of 1mSvyr-1 for water.
Keywords
Activity Concentration, Radioactivity, Environmental Matrices
To cite this article
Olalekan Ifayefunmi, Vyaceslav Kupriyanov, Oleg Mirzeabasov, Boris Synzynys, Review of Distribution of Natural Radiation in Some Parts of Nigeria, Nuclear Science. Vol. 4, No. 4, 2019, pp. 52-59. doi: 10.11648/j.ns.20190404.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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